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+I love books
+I love to travel
+I love Anime/Manga, I'm a sitcom junkie and I do Cosplay, Lolita and Gyaru. I'd like to start with recreating historical costumes too...
+I'm half Austrian, Half Filipina and live in Vienna/Austria

the world’s oldest ship war

reginaabyssi:

triptocaines:

mightyachilles:

Aeschylus: Achilles goes on top.
Plato: No; definitely Patroclus.
Xenophon: They were just friends.
Plato: Shut up, Xenophon.
Aeschines: It’s practically canon.
Aristarchus: I know it looks canon, but Homer didn’t write that - someone added it later.
Shakespeare: It’s canon.

Alexander is just that incoherent guy in the corner going “SDFkjhgksdjhf OTP”

#alexander and hephaestion straight up rp’d that shit#stripping naked and rubbing themselves down with oil and running up the beach wasn’t even the gayest part of that story

(Source: wearethemakersofmanners, via dark-vowelled)

rebelwomen:

thefingerfuckingfemalefury:

logicalabsurdity:

vsiorc:

Skeleton thought to be Etruscan warrior prince is actually a warrior princess

Prehistoric cave prints show most early artists were women

so what feminists have been saying for years and years is true. women have always been involved in hunting, have been warriors and have made art. women have been inventors and made great discoveries… and women experts are finally breaking through the sexism to get the facts heard.

"But bone analysis revealed the prince holding the lance was actually a 35- to 40-year-old woman, whereas the second skeleton belonged to a man.

Given that, what do archaeologists make of the spear?

"The spear, most likely, was placed as a symbol of union between the two deceased," Mandolesi told Viterbo News 24 on Sept. 26.

Weingarten doesn’t believe the symbol of unity explanation. Instead, she thinks the spear shows the woman’s high status.

Their explanation is “highly unlikely,” Weingarten told LiveScience. “She was buried with it next to her, not him.”

Gendered assumptions

The mix-up highlights just how easily both modern and old biases can color the interpretation of ancient graves.

In this instance, the lifestyles of the ancient Greeks and Romans may have skewed the view of the tomb. Whereas Greek women were cloistered away, Etruscan women, according to Greek historian Theopompus, were more carefree, working out, lounging nude, drinking freely, consorting with many men and raising children who did not know their fathers’ identities.

Instead of using objects found in a grave to interpret the sites, archaeologists should first rely on bone analysis or other sophisticated techniques before rushing to conclusions, Weingarten said.

"Until very recently, and sadly still in some countries, sex determination is based on grave goods. And that, in turn, is based almost entirely on our preconceptions. A clear illustration is jewelry: We associate jewelry with women, but that is nonsense in much of the ancient world," Weingarten said. "Guys liked bling, too.""

had prints are cave-art signatures…

"This is a surprise, since most archaeologists have assumed it was men who had been making the cave art. One interpretation is that early humans painted animals to influence the presence and fate of real animals that they’d find on their hunt, and it’s widely accepted that it was the men who found and killed dinner.

But a new study indicates that the majority of handprints found near cave art were made by women, based on their overall size and relative lengths of their fingers.

"The assumption that most people made was it had something to do with hunting magic," Penn State archaeologist Dean Snow, who has been scrutinizing hand prints for a decade, told NBC News. The new work challenges the theory that it was mostly men, who hunted, that made those first creative marks. 

Another reason we thought it was men all along? Male archeologists from modern society where gender roles are rigid and well-defined — they found the art. “[M]ale archaeologists were doing the work,” Snow said, and it’s possible that “had something to do with it.”  “

-MANIACAL LAUGHTER-

I can’t stop giggling over how DESPERATE male archelogists are to try and make up some bullshit to explain away the idea of women being warriors and hunters in the past

Gender bias in archeology has skewed our conception of early humans. But luckily, science is helping show the truth.

(Source: di-siorc, via nekotachi)

the-uncensored-she:

the-hairy-heroine:

amaeza:

you know, i’m a raging lesbian and i was never distracted by what other girls in my classes were wearing in high school. this is a male problem, not an “attracted to women” problem.

this is a “women need to constantly cater to men” problem.

Again, a male problem.

(Source: deteitte, via nekotachi)

nijuukoo:

muchymozzarella:

merlions:

twigwise:

  (x)

Look at Esmeralda tho, she like da fuck you smokin old man get out of my damn face, you creepy
Beautiful

No dudebros seriously every time you think that a girl is responsible for your bodily urges, you are Frollo

you are Frollo and you will die a fiery death

so yeah

don’t be Frollo

Every time you think that a girl is responsible for your bodily urges, you are Frollo.

(Source: disneydeviants, via comeonintothemadhouse)

skepticalavenger:


I wish I’d had this a few weeks ago, when I was telling students how not to present their data. This is a chart illustrating the effects of stand-your-ground-laws on murder in Florida.
I glanced at that and thought, “Whoa, surprise: the stand-your-ground-laws had a pretty dramatic effect in reducing murder. I did not expect that at all.”
And then I was a bit disappointed: “But they really should have set the Y axis at zero. It’s a bit misleading and magnifies the apparent effect, otherwise.”
And then I did a double-take: “They inverted the freaking Y axis!”
That’s right. It doesn’t show a decline, it shows a dramatic spike in murder after the law was passed. The text in the article actually says that clearly, but the chart was actively selling the opposite message. They’ve since added a corrected chart that actually makes the point clearly, instead of obscuring it.

I took away two points. It’s really easy to lie with graphics, and shouldn’t any evidence-based legal system recognize the consequences of passing a bad law and correct itself?

Unfreakinbelievable.

skepticalavenger:

I wish I’d had this a few weeks ago, when I was telling students how not to present their data. This is a chart illustrating the effects of stand-your-ground-laws on murder in Florida.

I glanced at that and thought, “Whoa, surprise: the stand-your-ground-laws had a pretty dramatic effect in reducing murder. I did not expect that at all.”

And then I was a bit disappointed: “But they really should have set the Y axis at zero. It’s a bit misleading and magnifies the apparent effect, otherwise.”

And then I did a double-take: “They inverted the freaking Y axis!”

That’s right. It doesn’t show a decline, it shows a dramatic spike in murder after the law was passed. The text in the article actually says that clearly, but the chart was actively selling the opposite message. They’ve since added a corrected chart that actually makes the point clearly, instead of obscuring it.

betterfloridagundeaths

I took away two points. It’s really easy to lie with graphics, and shouldn’t any evidence-based legal system recognize the consequences of passing a bad law and correct itself?

Unfreakinbelievable.

(via princess-saves-herself)

ranorudo:

Went to the newspaper homepage and this ad was on the top. “get closer to your closest ones” is the caption. Lesbians in advertisement makes me happy

ranorudo:

Went to the newspaper homepage and this ad was on the top. “get closer to your closest ones” is the caption. Lesbians in advertisement makes me happy

(Source: dn.se, via nekotachi)